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Category Archives: Arrested For Standing Up For Your Rights

This Elementary Teacher shows you what NOT to do when confronted by police

Austin, TX – Pulled over for driving 15 mph over the speed limit, an elementary school teacher was recorded on police dash cam video being slammed to the ground twice by an overly aggressive cop. After the woman was placed in the back of a patrol car, two separate videos caught the arresting officer making false statements regarding the arrest and another officer making racist comments to the restrained teacher.

At 12:30 p.m. on June 15, 2015, Austin Police Officer Bryan Richter pulled over 26-year-old Breaion King for driving 15 mph over the speed limit. According to Richter’s dash cam video, the officer immediately ordered King to step back inside her car before informing the teacher that she had been stopped for speeding.

Complying with his orders, King sat inside her car and gave Richter her driver’s license as commanded. When ordered to put her feet inside so Richter could close her door, King asked, “Could you please hurry up?”

Instantly losing his temper, Richter demanded, “Okay, ma’am, stand up for me. Okay?”

“Okay,” King responded.

Despite the fact that King had been complying with his commands and had agreed to exit her vehicle, Richter suddenly grabbed her for no apparent reason before she could step out of her car.

“Why are you touching me?” King asked in absolute terror. “Oh my God!”

“Stop resisting!” Richter immediately shouted. “Get out of the car!”

“I’m getting out,” King replied. “Let me get out.”

Gripping King’s neck and arm, Richter abruptly pulled her out of the car and whipped her around before violently slamming her against the ground.

“Put your hands behind your back!” Richter ordered.

“Oh my God!” King pleaded. “Are you serious?”

“I’m about to taze you,” Richter threatened as King stood up and placed her hands behind her back.

“Are you kidding me?” King asked as Richter swept her legs and threw her to the ground again for no apparent reason.

“Put your hands behind your back,” Richter repeated while pressing his full weight down on her back.

“Would you let me get down, please?” King pleaded.

After cuffing the 112-pound woman, Richter and a fellow officer led King to the front of his patrol car by lifting her arms behind her back in a torture position. Before she was placed inside the back of the car, King genuinely asked, “Why are my arms so high up?”

Later in the video, Richter recounted the incident to a superior while blatantly making false statements.

“Once we got out of the car, she took a swing at me,” Richter lied. “She missed. And then she swings – and I saw it coming – so I just threw her down. We were on the ground. I didn’t want to hit her. So we just kinda wrestled.”

Falsely stating that King had slipped out of her restraints and needed to be thrown against the pavement again, Richter gave a version of events that failed to corroborate with his own dash cam video. While sitting in the backseat, restrained in handcuffs, King was later subjected to a second officer’s racist comments as he transported her to jail.

“Why are so many people afraid of black people?” Officer Patrick Spradlin asked King in the second video.

“That’s what I want to figure out because I’m not a bad black person,” King responded.

“I can give you a really good idea why it might be that way,” Spradlin continued.

“Why?” King asked.

“Violent tendencies,” Spradlin answered.

Ironically, King was nonviolent when Richter suddenly pulled her out of the car without giving her any time to comply with his orders. Although she had initially been charged with resisting arrest, King’s case was dismissed earlier this year and she ended up paying $165 for driving 50 mph in a 35 mph zone.

After requesting a federal investigation into the incident from the Justice Department, Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo publicly apologized to King and her family at a press conference on Thursday.

“I’m sorry that on the day you were stopped for going 15 miles an hour, you were approached and treated in a manner that is not consistent with this police chief and department,” Chief Acevedo stated. “We’re in 2016 and this will not be tolerated.”

 

Michigan Goes Total Police State With Roadside Saliva Check Points

Michigan goes total police state.

Regardless of your stance on drugs, I think most would agree that the Michigan State Police has no right to ‘run roadside saliva check points’.

The pilot program will be launching in five Michigan counties this year according to this MLive report:

The Michigan State Police is working on plans to establish a pilot program for roadside drug testing, a spokeswoman said.

A new law instructs the state police to pick five counties where it will run a one-year pilot program for saliva-based testing to check drivers for drugs like marijuana, heroin and cocaine.

“We expect the counties to be finalized this summer with a pilot to begin sometime later in the year,” MSP spokeswoman Shanon Banner said.

The five counties will be determined based on criteria including: the number of impaired driving crashes;the number of impaired drivers arrested; and the number of Drug Recognition Experts (DREs) trained in the county, she said.

Attorney Neil Rockind, founder of Southfield-based criminal defense law firm Rockind Law, opposed the legislation he said would set a “dangerous precedent” for Michigan.

“The criminal justice system wants to take science and turn it into a fast, easy utility,” Rockind said. “Science is neither fast nor easy.”

According to the Office of Highway Safety Planning, as of February, Michigan had 99 Certified Drug Recognition Experts in 37 counties.

DRE officers have received “highly specified training” to allow them to identify drivers with drug impairment, Banner said.

The saliva analysis will only be administered by a DRE, she said, and will be given along with the drug recognition 12-step evaluation currently used. DREs employed by state, county and municipal agencies could also be involved.

The law instructs the MSP to conduct a pilot program meant to establish policies in the area of roadside drug analysis, Banner said, and to make a determination of the accuracy and reliability of the tests.

Average Americans Commit 3 Felonies a Day

Violent crime is down America, across the board, spanning two decades. Earlier this month, the Justice Department announced that the incidence of reported rape had hit a 20-year low. Homicides are down, as are juvenile violence and crimes committed against children. Crime rates have been plummeting since the early 1990s to such an extent that explaining the drop has become something of an obsession among criminologists and sociologists.

Part of the drop can of course be explained by mass incarceration—America leads the world in the percentage of its population behind bars. Putting one in every 100 citizens in jail causes its own problems, and there’s plenty of debate over just how much that incarceration has contributed to the fall in violent crime. But there’s no question that we’ve put lots of people in prison over the last 20 years, the crime rate has fallen, and part of the public likely believes (with some justification) that there’s a link betweent the two.

But there’s something else going on too, picked up in the blogosphere last week by George Washington University political science Professor John Sides. According to Gallup, since 2002 the percentage of the American public who think violent crime is on the rise has been increasing, even as actual violent crime rates continue to fall. Sides notes that from 1989 to 2001, perception and reality somewhat went hand in hand. But 2002 to 2003 saw a 19 percent leap in public perceptions that violent crime was on the uptick, and the figure has been going up in the years since—to 74 percent today. What’s going on?

From the time Richard Nixon made crime a national political issue in the 1970s, we’ve been conditioned by politicians and public officials to live in perpetual fear. Our baseline is that there’s too much crime, and that we aren’t doing enough about it. Despite that, there was an actually drop in public worry about crime that began in 1992 and continued until 2002. As noted, that drop corresponded with an actual decline in the national crime rate, something that hadn’t happened in 30 years. That crime rates going down for the first time in a generation was something new, something worth noticing. The 1990s were also generally an optimistic decade. The economy was humming. We weren’t engaged in any major wars. We didn’t have many worries, period.

Post-2002, the national mood soured. Terrorism, obviously a form of violent crime, was all over the news. The economy slowed down. Illegal immigration once again became a national issue, along with the false assumption that undocumented immigrants bring violent crime. And so we returned to a state of fear, though the crime rate continued to fall.These fluctuations in the Gallup poll are interesting, but it’s worth noting that the percentage of respondents who believe violent crime is on the rise has dipped below 60 percent only three times since 1991. This, again, despite the fact that violent crime has been in decline over the entire period.

Fear makes for easy politics. It both wins votes and primes us to give government more power at the expense of personal liberty. And that’s certainly true when it comes to crime. With the possible exception of an incumbent mayor, politicians only benefit from exaggerating the threat of violent crime. Senators, Congressmen, and even governors are rarely held responsible when the crime rate goes up. But they do win votes by proposing new powers for police and prosecutors to bring it down.

The result has been a one-way ratchet effect on crime policy. We’re perpetually expanding police and prosecutorial power, a process only occasionally slowed by the courts. Congress and state legislatures rarely take old criminal statutes off the books, but they’re always adding new ones. A 2008 report from the Heritage Foundation estimates that at the federal level alone, Congress has been adding about 55 new crimes to the federal criminal code each year since the 1980s. There are now about 4,500 separate federal crimes. And that doesn’t include federal regulations, which are increasingly being enforced with criminal, not administrative, penalties. It also doesn’t include the increasing leeway with which prosecutors can enforce broadly written federal conspiracy, racketeering, and money laundering laws. And this is before we even get to the states’ criminal codes.

In his new book, the Boston-based civil liberties advocate and occasional Reason contributor Harvey Silverglate estimates that in 2009, the average American commits about three federal felonies per day. And yet, we aren’t a nation of degenerates. On the contrary, most social indicators have been moving in a positive direction for a generation. Silverglate argues we’re committing these crimes unwittingly. The federal criminal code has become so vast and open to interpretation, Silverglate argues, that a U.S. Attorney can find a way to charge just about anyone with violating federal law. In fact, it’s nearly impossible for some business owners to comply with one federal regulation without violating another one. We’re no longer governed by laws, we’re governed by the whims of lawyers.Whatever one may think of Ayn Rand’s political philosophy or ethics, her criminal justice prophecy has proven unsettlingly accurate: In our continuing eagerness to purge American society of crime, we’ve allowed the government to make us all into criminals.

“There’s no way to rule innocent men.
The only power government has is the power to crack down on criminals.
Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them.
One declares so many things to be a crime
that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.”

Ayn Rand 

Michigan Deputy Resigns To Avoid Being Fired After Questionable Stop

A Michigan deputy who resigned to avoid termination after he was caught on video pulling a man out of a car for asking a simple question is now working for another law enforcement agency, despite the fact he has an established reputation for aggressive and unprofessional behavior towards citizens.

But considering his new employer, the Lenawee County Sheriff’s Office, is looking into introducing body and dash cams for its deputies, we will likely see more videos of his aggressive behavior in the future.

However, his previous employer, the Eaton County Sheriff’s Office, had also required him to wear a body cam – which he was not doing on June 16, 2014 when he pulled over Todd Micheal Brenizer for a broken tail light.

But unknowing to Brown, Brenizer was recording the traffic stop, which is what led to him resigning.

Brenizer, who was charged with resisting arrest and obstruction, was cleared of those charges when he showed prosecutors the video.

He is now negotiating a settlement with Eaton County, according to Lansing City Pulse.

The video begins showing Brenizer upset at Brown’s aggressive attitude and the fact that he did not even give him a chance to search for his proof of insurance.

In the video, Brenizer is explaining what had taken place before he started recording when Brown returns with citations for a broken taillight and failure to provide proof of insurance.

Brenizer attempts to ask several questions including his name and badge number, but Brown tells him that information is on the citation.

Brenizer agains requests more information as Brown demands he move his vehicle or go to jail.
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Brown then starts yelling, “get the fuck out of the car or you’re going to jail.”

Brown then flings open the door while Brenizer remains adamant that he had done nothing wrong.

After a brief struggle, Brenizer is forced out and ordered to lay down on the ground.

In Brown’s arrest report, he stated that he “Brenizer had a right to ask him questions but instructed him to leave as he was blocking the roadway.”

He then said that “he refused and I grabbed him to escort him out of the vehicle and he pulled me into the vehicle,” which is how he justified the resisting arrest and obstruction charges.

Eaton County sheriff officials said that Brown had been required to wear a body camera due to a previous instance of unruly behavior with another citizen, but he had failed to do so.

Questions remain why Brown was not charged with false arrest or filing a sworn affidavit against Brenizer, but we can surmise it was an extension of Blue Privilege, which is all to common in the profession.

Brown’s resignation did not prohibit him from obtaining a position at Lenawee County Sheriff’s Department, yet one more Blue Privilege.

The first video below is edited to get right to the part when Brown pulls Brenizer out the car. The second video is the longer version.

It was just over a year ago when another Eaton County sheriff’s deputy named Jonathan Frost pulled over a teenager named Deven Guilford over for flashing his high beams at him, resulting in the deputy shooting and killing the teen.

CALL LENAWEE OR SEND AN EMAIL TO TELL THEM HOW WE FEEL ABOUT DEPUTY GREG BROWN!

Sheriff Jack Welsh: 517.264.5368

Deputy Gregory Brown
Phone: 517-263-0524 ext: 2178
greg.brown@lenawee.mi.us