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Dallas Cop Breaks Rank, Says Blacks Wrongly Arrested to Fill Quotas, Warns National Guard May Be Next

Following the murders of five officers in Dallas, the media and public alike lamented that the attack had ironically been perpetrated against ‘one of the most progressive police departments in the nation,’ thanks to Chief David Brown at the helm — but a current Dallas officer has now come forward with allegations much to the contrary.

Officer Nick Novello serves in the Dallas Police Department, and has for 34 years, but the leadership of Chief Brown, the officer says, has been anything but the rosy portrait of unity he paints in public.

In fact, even before the fatal shootings earlier this month, bitterness and animosity over Brown’s leadership decisions have marred morale in the department. Novello accuses Brown of making sweeping choices concerning schedules and more without consulting anyone — and, as a consequence, officers are overworked and underpaid.

But a rather striking accusation tears apart Brown’s supposed outreach to the black community: Novello says distrust of the department by African-Americans has been fueled by a number of wrongful arrests to fill drug and public intoxication quotas.

Brown extended an invitation to black protesters angered over police shootings, saying, “We’re hiring. We’ll give you an application. We’ll help you resolve some of the problems you’re protesting about.

“And we’ll put you in your neighborhood …”

But, as Novello noted in an interview with the Daily Mail, “If he wants them to sign up, he had better stop criminalizing them for things like having small amounts of marijuana.

“Some officers fit people up by arresting them for being intoxicated when they refuse to show their IDs and that leads to a criminal record and difficulties finding a job

“Officers are under pressure to reach targets. There has to be an end to the arrest and ticket quota that exists within the Dallas Police Department.”

He added sharply, “I am sick and tired of the public face of togetherness the chief puts on when he knows there’s a lot of bad feeling behind the scenes.”

Policing for revenue, Novello explained, has rendered the department ineffectual in dealing with issues of greater importance — worse, he feels filling quotas contributes to predatory policing by emboldening officers with power over the people they should be protecting.

“There is a lot of anger out there that we have an inability to police ourselves and we will protect a rogue cop as a police department,” Novello said.

“A lot of the black community are supportive of the police, and that is wonderful, but a large number say police can’t police themselves,” Novello continued. “Not only can’t we police ourselves, we go out of our way to protect the predator cop.

“In my estimation, the quota system is corrupt. You are telling the officer who has a great deal of power that he is required to exercise that and generate funds for the city. Arrests generate money.

“As a beat cop, I see the computer, I see the calls holding, I see the inability to dispatch and deal with real-time needs.”

Beyond ticket and arrest quotas, officers already furious over long hours, low pay, and understaffing became enraged and protested when Brown made sweeping shift changes. Those changes to hundreds of officers’ shifts prompted four police associations — the Black Police Association of Dallas, the Dallas Fraternal Order of Police, the National Latino Law Enforcement Organization’s Dallas chapter, and the Dallas Police Association — to call for Brown’s resignation.

But the chief’s refusal to give up his job only caused resentment among the force to fester.

“We are vastly understaffed,” Novello said. “Last month we lost 48-50 officers, which is unheard of. One officer left to go drive a Coca-Cola truck. Another who was 43 years old retired after 14 years saying, ‘I’m out, I’m out.’ Morale is very low.”

Officers left in droves, in part, due to trauma over the slaughter of five of Novello’s colleagues. Keeping the DPD sufficiently staffed, Novello warned, has become a matter of grave importance — without enough cops in the department, “the only viable solution would be that we embrace the assistance of the National Guard or some federal agency to help police the streets of Dallas,” though, obviously, that “would be very unpalatable because it would mean the loss of state, city sovereignty.

“As a police officer, I can look you in the eye and say, ‘We have got your back, we are out there patrolling’ … but no, we are not. I can recall a number of days when I went to detail in the morning and there might have been seven of us there and after they put officers on special assignment, there was one or two police officers for the whole district.”

Despite the veteran cop’s criticisms of his chief, he emphasized he doesn’t want to “besmirch the man and I have nothing personal against him. I harbor no anger at him […] But I have no confidence in the man at all. He is very dictatorial. He is not open to questions. It is his show.”

Brown, as the Daily Mail noted, has boasted about lowered rates of homicide and violent crime in Dallas in recent years — in fact, 2015 marked the 12th consecutive reduction in crime and a low homicide rate not seen since 1930. But Novello said Brown was just “grandstanding. He knows it is all about public perception.”

Rank-and-file officers, Novello explained, do a fantastic job and aren’t part of his critique of the department, but as for the problems directly affecting the force,

“I believe the public has a right to know. A real right to know and not just receive managed information.”

As for whether he had concerns about whistleblowing, Novello said being honest about what’s actually going on behind the scenes has greater importance than even his keeping the job. Were he to be terminated for speaking out, Novello said,

“I believe it would give me a platform to speak. Anything I speak about … I can prove everything I say.”

Quotas of varying types — whether by race, as what another whistleblower cop from the NYPD alleged and caught on tape, or by type of offense, as described by Novello — undoubtedly drive the issues of police violence and systemic racism through profiling. As The Free Thought Project reported previously, Philando Castile — the black man shot by an officer in Falcon Heights, Minnesota — had been pulled over a whopping 52 times by officers prior to his killing. As the Washington Post noted, these stops — all non-violent, non-criminal ‘offenses’ — had generated $6,588 in fines and fees for the city from one man.

Policing in the U.S. now revolves around revenue-generation, and until that changes — and these official and unofficial quota systems with it — the cycle of violence and resentment will inevitably continue.

Average Americans Commit 3 Felonies a Day

Violent crime is down America, across the board, spanning two decades. Earlier this month, the Justice Department announced that the incidence of reported rape had hit a 20-year low. Homicides are down, as are juvenile violence and crimes committed against children. Crime rates have been plummeting since the early 1990s to such an extent that explaining the drop has become something of an obsession among criminologists and sociologists.

Part of the drop can of course be explained by mass incarceration—America leads the world in the percentage of its population behind bars. Putting one in every 100 citizens in jail causes its own problems, and there’s plenty of debate over just how much that incarceration has contributed to the fall in violent crime. But there’s no question that we’ve put lots of people in prison over the last 20 years, the crime rate has fallen, and part of the public likely believes (with some justification) that there’s a link betweent the two.

But there’s something else going on too, picked up in the blogosphere last week by George Washington University political science Professor John Sides. According to Gallup, since 2002 the percentage of the American public who think violent crime is on the rise has been increasing, even as actual violent crime rates continue to fall. Sides notes that from 1989 to 2001, perception and reality somewhat went hand in hand. But 2002 to 2003 saw a 19 percent leap in public perceptions that violent crime was on the uptick, and the figure has been going up in the years since—to 74 percent today. What’s going on?

From the time Richard Nixon made crime a national political issue in the 1970s, we’ve been conditioned by politicians and public officials to live in perpetual fear. Our baseline is that there’s too much crime, and that we aren’t doing enough about it. Despite that, there was an actually drop in public worry about crime that began in 1992 and continued until 2002. As noted, that drop corresponded with an actual decline in the national crime rate, something that hadn’t happened in 30 years. That crime rates going down for the first time in a generation was something new, something worth noticing. The 1990s were also generally an optimistic decade. The economy was humming. We weren’t engaged in any major wars. We didn’t have many worries, period.

Post-2002, the national mood soured. Terrorism, obviously a form of violent crime, was all over the news. The economy slowed down. Illegal immigration once again became a national issue, along with the false assumption that undocumented immigrants bring violent crime. And so we returned to a state of fear, though the crime rate continued to fall.These fluctuations in the Gallup poll are interesting, but it’s worth noting that the percentage of respondents who believe violent crime is on the rise has dipped below 60 percent only three times since 1991. This, again, despite the fact that violent crime has been in decline over the entire period.

Fear makes for easy politics. It both wins votes and primes us to give government more power at the expense of personal liberty. And that’s certainly true when it comes to crime. With the possible exception of an incumbent mayor, politicians only benefit from exaggerating the threat of violent crime. Senators, Congressmen, and even governors are rarely held responsible when the crime rate goes up. But they do win votes by proposing new powers for police and prosecutors to bring it down.

The result has been a one-way ratchet effect on crime policy. We’re perpetually expanding police and prosecutorial power, a process only occasionally slowed by the courts. Congress and state legislatures rarely take old criminal statutes off the books, but they’re always adding new ones. A 2008 report from the Heritage Foundation estimates that at the federal level alone, Congress has been adding about 55 new crimes to the federal criminal code each year since the 1980s. There are now about 4,500 separate federal crimes. And that doesn’t include federal regulations, which are increasingly being enforced with criminal, not administrative, penalties. It also doesn’t include the increasing leeway with which prosecutors can enforce broadly written federal conspiracy, racketeering, and money laundering laws. And this is before we even get to the states’ criminal codes.

In his new book, the Boston-based civil liberties advocate and occasional Reason contributor Harvey Silverglate estimates that in 2009, the average American commits about three federal felonies per day. And yet, we aren’t a nation of degenerates. On the contrary, most social indicators have been moving in a positive direction for a generation. Silverglate argues we’re committing these crimes unwittingly. The federal criminal code has become so vast and open to interpretation, Silverglate argues, that a U.S. Attorney can find a way to charge just about anyone with violating federal law. In fact, it’s nearly impossible for some business owners to comply with one federal regulation without violating another one. We’re no longer governed by laws, we’re governed by the whims of lawyers.Whatever one may think of Ayn Rand’s political philosophy or ethics, her criminal justice prophecy has proven unsettlingly accurate: In our continuing eagerness to purge American society of crime, we’ve allowed the government to make us all into criminals.

“There’s no way to rule innocent men.
The only power government has is the power to crack down on criminals.
Well, when there aren’t enough criminals, one makes them.
One declares so many things to be a crime
that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.”

Ayn Rand 

Woman claims Hazel Park police officer used confiscated cell phone to spy on her inside her home

HAZEL PARK, Mich. – A woman claims a Hazel Park police officer was spying on her inside her home.  On Tuesday, she and her family filed a lawsuit against the officer.

The lawsuit alleges the officer confiscated a man’s cell phone during a marijuana arrest. According to the lawsuit the man is a licensed caregiver under the Medical Marijuana Act, but was arrested on marijuana charges.

The man and his fiance are new parents. In the lawsuit, the woman alleges the cell phone confiscated by the Hazel Park officer is hooked up the nanny cam inside her infant son’s bedroom.

In the lawsuit, she claims there were at least two occasions when she was naked and breastfeeding her infant son when the light to the camera turned on. She claims the only device hooked up at the time was her fiance’s phone.

At that point, she used the ‘Find My iPhone’ application and traced the phone to the officer’s personal address, where she believes he was watching her.

Now, the family has filed a lawsuit, claiming their rights were violated and they’re requesting a jury trial.

7 Action News spoke with the Hazel Park Chief of Police. He will confirm the man named is indeed an officer with his department, but he has not seen the lawsuit or been served anything, so he can not comment on it.

There will be a news conference tomorrow about this case. 7 Action News will continue to bring you updates as they become available.

 

Cop Who Raped Handcuffed Girl, Has Been Shot by Woman — Officials Suggest Shooting Was Vengeance

San Antonio, TX — Officer Jackie Neal of the San Antonio PD, has been on paid vacation for the last year and a half for accusations of crimes that his chief referred to as “unthinkable.” After evidence linked him to this vile crime, he’s still been receiving his over-deserved salary of $62,556.00.

Neal, 40, was in full uniform, in a marked squad car and on-duty when he made a traffic stop on a Friday morning in November of 2013. He then proceeded to sexually assault a 19-year-old woman, according to the San Antonio Police Department.

He forced the young woman to bend over, with her face in the rear seat of the police car. He pulled her pants and underwear down to her ankles and sexually assaulted her, according to the complaint. At that point, Neal admonished her that if she told anyone, he would know where to find her and drove off, leaving her standing there.

Thursday night, Neal was shot in the neck by an unnamed female assailant. He is currently in critical condition.

While the name of the woman in custody has not yet been released, police suggested that the incident was linked to the earlier rape allegations, says News4SanAntonio.

The shooting happened at Neal’s home in the 9100 block of Arroyo Hondo in Helotes, Texas. Police were called to the scene shortly after 7 pm on Thursday and found Neal with a bullet wound in his neck.

In January of last year, the woman claiming to be raped by Neal filed a $10 million lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in San Antonio. She named the Neal, Police Chief William McManus and the city as defendants.

According to the complaint, Neal had been suspended for three days in September, stemming from “a morally reprehensible and inappropriate” relationship with a female high school student enrolled in the Police Explorer Program. Neal was an advisor to the program in which students learn about police work, according to the Houston Chronicle.

The complaint alleged that Neal had sexual relations with the girl, who was an 18-year-old high school senior when the relationship ended in February 2013.

Judging from the past allegations against Neal, the shooter could have been any number of former female victims.